Summary

The program aims at more effective and viable coordinated management at the level of national protected area institutions of the WAP complex (consisting of the W, Arly and Pendjari parks) and their animal and plant resources.

The aim is to ensure the conservation and promotion of natural potential as a source of added value that can contribute to poverty reduction by strengthening the sustainable and efficient conservation of WAP complex ecosystems from a regional perspective with an optimization of the benefits for the region. riparian population.

Under this South-South cooperation, planning and joint implementation of actions for the regionality of this common hastage have been initiated.

Problem

The WAP (W-Arly-Pendjari Parks) complex remains a major ecological unit in West Africa, constituting the main area of Sudanese ecosystems in a good state of conservation. The complex is organized around two units, centered respectively on the W park (which covers the three countries) and the ensemble of Arly (Burkina Faso) and Pendjari (Benin). Nearly 3,000,000 ha are protected, about half of which are under national park status (W and Pendjari).

This regional complex faces the growing challenges posed by climate instability, the fragility of natural resources as well as population growth and the ever-increasing needs of society that exert continued pressure on resources, biological diversity and the habitat.

This network of protected areas demonstrates the willingness of the three states to respond to environmental challenges and strengthen their weak institutional capacity and the financial resources to cope with them.

In addition, one of the significant challenges that the three countries face is the security challenge. Indeed, the forecasts of increase in tourism receipts related to the various developments made in the WAP complex, which were supposed to contribute to improve the mobilization of additional financial resources for the management of the complex's assets, were very negatively influenced by threats recorded in two of the three countries covered.

Solution 

Set up between December 2011 and June 2014, the objective of the program is to sustainably strengthen the conservation of the WAP complex ecosystems (W, Arly and Pendjari Parks) in a regional perspective and with optimized benefits for the riverside population.

The cooperation has put in place a Master Plan for the development of the WAP protected areas cross-border complex on the basis of which each country draws up a management plan for the Park and strategies to fight against poaching and protection of large carnivores. This initiative also undertook an advocacy with the government of Burkina Faso for the revision of the legal status and the boundaries of the Arly Park for a better management of the ecosystems of the WAP complex and to influence the other countries.

This South-South cooperation enabled the 3 countries to have 2 development plans and a concerted management plan for the two blocks of parks and to coordinate their investment efforts for the promotion of parks and the protection of their biodiversity. (PAG ecological block of the 3 parks of W and PAG ecological block parks Arly and Pendjari). This cooperation has made it possible to better preserve the fauna biodiversity of the three countries.

It has also enabled the three countries to put in place / have a single, joint planning framework for their interventions for the sustainable management of the natural resources of the WAP complex. The signing by these States of a Tripartite Agreement for joint management at the close of the program is a major achievement, a considerable achievement indicating the readiness of these States to appropriate and pool their human, technical and financial resources for sustainable and joint management of this common heritage.

Supported by: EU, UEMOA, UNDP, Governments of Benin, Niger and Burkina Faso

Implementing Agency: UNDP, National Center of Management of Wildlife Reserves (CENAGREF) - Benin; General Directorate of Forests and Wildlife and National Office of Protected Areas (OFINAP) - Burkina Faso; Directorate of Wildlife, Hunting and Protected Areas (DFC / AP) and Directorate General of Environment and Water and Forests (DGEEF) - Niger

Contact:
UNDP Benin: Elisabeth Tossou This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
UNDP Burkina Faso: Clarisse Coulibaly This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
UNDP Niger: Elhadj Mahamane Lawali - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Summary

With the support of UNDP, the National Council for the Environment for Sustainable Development in Niger organized in March 2015 an international workshop on sharing experiences on food security and resilience, which brought together 11 countries. The result is the establishment of a community of practitioners.

Problem

Ending hunger, ensuring food security and improving nutrition are at the heart of the Sustainable Development Goals. The world is committed to eradicating extreme poverty and hunger by 2030.

Sub-Saharan Africa is one of the most food-insecure regions in the world. Climate change, particularly the more and more extreme and frequent meteorological hazards, are impacting agro-ecosystems, agricultural production and livelihoods on which much of the more vulnerable rural population depends.

Therefore, ensuring food security in the face of climate change is one of the most important challenges facing policy makers seeking to prioritize actions to reduce vulnerability and increase the resilience of food systems to ensure food security and livelihoods. good nutrition for all.

Created by Decree No. 96-004 / PM of January 9, 1996, amended and supplemented by Decree No. 2000-272 / PRN / PM of August 4, 2000, the CNEDD is attached to the Office of the Prime Minister. Its mission in relation with all stakeholders is to develop, coordinate the implementation, monitor and evaluate the National Environment Plan for Sustainable Development (PNEDD), a reference framework for policy in Niger. It is the National Focal Point for all post Rio conventions (CCD, CBD, UNFCCC).

Solution

The National Council for the Environment for Sustainable Development in Niger organized an international workshop in early March 2015 to share experiences, lessons learned and emerging successes in terms of food security and resilience. The workshop, organized as part of the regional project "Adaptation to Climate Change for Food Security in Africa" brought together 11 southern countries in Niamey.

The aim is to promote the promotion of South-South cooperation and to improve the understanding of community-based adaptation initiatives, in particular, the gender dimension, climate information systems for informed decision-making. and integrated planning approaches.

The results obtained are the setting up of a community of practitioners between projects thus offering the opportunity to share their experiences.

Supported by: UNDP

Implementing Agency: The National Council for the Environment for Sustainable Development (CNEDD) Niger

Contact:
UNDP Niger.
Amata Diabate
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Summary

Capacity building of least developed countries to counteract the adverse effects of climate change through the formulation and implementation of the National Climate Change Adaptation Plan (NAP).

Problem

On the occasion of the Cancún Climate Conference in 2010, the States Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) adopted the National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) process. This process defines the medium- and long-term adaptations needed to reduce the vulnerability of states and their people to climate change. With the NAP process, states anchor climate change adaptation in their national development plans. The Paris Climate Agreement signed in 2015 at COP21 emphasizes the importance of the NAP process for international efforts to adapt to climate change. However, the NAP formulation process requires expertise and organizational, participatory and governance structures that are not always available and/or sufficiently consolidated in the least developed countries of sub-Saharan Africa.

Solution

As part of the implementation of the NAP process, Benin has opted to participate in a series of training and exchange of experiences activities for LDCs:

  • A regional training of trainers workshop in November 2013 for eighty (80) participants from seventeen (17) African countries. held in Addis Ababa (Ethiopia). The overall objective of this train-the-trainer workshop is to foster an understanding of the Global Water Partnership (GWP) / UNDP-GEF Capacity Building Joint Initiative on the Economics of Adaptation and Water Security. for development resilient to climate change.
  • Since March 2016, Benin has been part of a group of 9 developing countries that share experiences of building capacity for mainstreaming climate change into development policy tools and instruments as part of Benin's Preparation for Development. access to the Green Climate Fund. As part of this project, a methodological guide has been developed to integrate climate change considerations into planning documents.
  • Knowledge exchange in the framework of the regional workshop to assess readiness levels of LDCs in Ethiopia in April 2014 training of trainers in support of the state in developing NAPs. This training took place in Morocco in June 2016 as part of the Global Support Program to the NAP process. This training allowed the participants who are now trainers to master the NAP guidelines, the skills assessment for a national adaptation plan, the NAP issues, the process of formulation, implementation and follow-up.

Evaluation of NAPs. The purpose of these activities was to transfer knowledge and skills by taking advantage of the experiences of other African countries. Benin's expertise in the formulation of NAPs has been strengthened with the participation of climate change experts and specialists from country offices.

Supported by: UNDP

Implementing Agency:
Benin: Ministry of the Environment, Housing and Urbanism

Contact:
Isidore Agbokou,
Team Leader Environment,
UNDP Benin,
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Wednesday, 27 June 2018 11:08

Summary

Exchange visits made in 2011 and 2012 between the Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Madagascar and the Ouagadougou Arbitration, Mediation and Conciliation Center (CAMC-O) of Burkina Faso with the aim of setting up a center of arbitration and mediation backed by a sustainable structure in Madagascar. The initiative aims to contribute to strengthening the competitiveness of enterprises in Madagascar through the improvement of the business climate, particularly regarding the execution of commercial contracts and the adoption of alternative means of dispute resolution (ADR) in the country.

Problem

Being ranked among the least developed countries, Madagascar is recognized for its strong potential, especially in natural resources, which unfortunately can not reverse the impoverishment curve. On average, economic growth (2.3% on average between 2010 and 2015) is still well below population growth (2.8% on average), and reflects a decline in the per capita income of the population and a rate of poverty reaching over 80%.

Also, the establishment of a framework favorable to the promotion of the private sector, in its role of creator of wealth, has always been at the heart of the various successive strategies implemented in Madagascar.

Concerning the improvement of the execution of commercial contracts in particular, an Arbitration and Mediation Center was created in Madagascar (CAMM) in 2000, in the form of a private association. The center was able to benefit from support from certain technical and financial partners. If the CAMM had the merit of existing, as an arbitration center wanted and desired by the business community and the private sector, the fact remains that recourse to the center has been limited: a A dozen cases of arbitration and mediation have been settled by the CAMM since its creation - and the center was practically no longer operational in 2011. However, a study conducted in the same year with local companies showed that 65% of among them have a positive perception of mediation and arbitration, 70% consider their positive impact on the legal business environment, and 53% are ready to provide for a mediation and / or arbitration clause in their contract.

The challenge is therefore to revive alternative modes of trade in Madagascar, drawing lessons from the past to ensure the sustainability of service provision.

Respond to the need to strengthen governance and the functioning of the entrepreneurship and business climate through the prevention and resolution of trade conflicts. The aim is to encourage the search for amicable solutions to disputes arising or in the process of mediation and arbitration through a mechanism for the settlement of disputes and disputes between parties with the intervention of a third party, the arbitrator (or several referees).

Solution

 

In order to respond to the challenge of relaunching the MARCs, but especially their sustainability, the importance of backing the promoter entity to a sustainable structure, led by the private sector (main user) was favored.

Studies and consultations have identified the Antananarivo Chamber of Commerce and Industry (CCIA) as a potential institution to bring the new CAMM, like many successful experiments elsewhere.

In order to ensure full ownership of the vision and approach by the private sector, UNDP supported the organization of a induction and training stay for high-level CCIA representatives at the Center. Mediation and Arbitration of Paris (CAMP) and the Center of Arbitration, Mediation and Conciliation of Ouagadougou (CMAC-O).

The South-South cooperation solution adopted consists of a series of exchange trips in 2011 and 2012 with the objective of preparing the leaders of the CCIA and the private sector in general to take full ownership of the concept and the role they will play. to play in the new configuration of the CAMM to give more depth to mediation and arbitration in Madagascar.

At the end of the mission, a task force composed by the missionaries was set up to pilot the revitalization of CAMM backed by the CCIA.

The group oversaw the review of CAMM's constitution and bylaws, the recruitment of a new SG as well as its capacity building within CMAP and CAMC-O, and the training of mediators for the center (a pool of referees having been inherited from the former CAMM).

The CAMM backed by the CCIA has been operational since 2012. In 2013, it initiated the "Business Bridge OI" network, which groups the commercial conflict management centers of the Indian Ocean islands, in order to facilitate commercial relations between these centers later.

Supported by: UNDP

Implementing Agency: Chamber of Commerce and Industry of Antananarivo

Contact:
Hasina Ramarson,
Program Manager,
Poverty Reduction / Private Sector,
UNDP Madagascar,
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Wednesday, 27 June 2018 10:45

Summary

Exchange of regional experiences on building peace infrastructure at a kick-off and orientation workshop facilitated by experts from the West African Network for Peacebuilding (WANEP), which included national consolidation structures peace and security and civil society organizations under the anchor of the High Authority for Peacebuilding (HACP).

Problem

Niger is characterized by a multiplicity of conflict risk factors that compromise its development efforts. In 2014, a study identified the pressure of access to natural resources and the poor redistribution of public resources (extractive industry resources), risks derived from population growth, political and institutional instability as well as border issues as the main ones. conflict factors in Niger. In addition, the study reported that despite the existence of a variety of actors dealing with different types of conflict, coordination and capacity for conflict prevention / management remains weak.

Solution

Exchange of regional experiences on the establishment of a peace infrastructure at a kick-off and orientation workshop facilitated by experts from the West African Network for Peacebuilding (WANEP), with the support of UNDP and to which took part in the national peacebuilding and security structures and the civil society organizations under the High Authority for Peacebuilding (HACP).

The workshop was organized following the recommendations of the Study on Conflict Factors in Niger in 2014. The sharing of experiences from countries in the region (Ghana, in particular) convinced the High Authority to consolidate peace ( HACP) hitherto reluctant to the need for better coordination of national structures for peacebuilding and security. At the end of the workshop, a monitoring committee was set up under the aegis of the HACP to steer the process.

Supported by: UNDP

Implementing Agency: High Authority for Peace Consolidation (HACP)

Contact:
Amata DIABATE,
Economic Adviser,
UNDP Niger,
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Summary

As part of the Regional Adaptation Program for Africa and Food Security (TICAD V. CC), knowledge sharing actions have been put in place with Kenya. The aim was to strengthen the capacity of the staff of the Directorate General of Meteorology (DGM) in the areas of administration and maintenance of ADCON stations, the operation and the constitution of a database of stations automatic weather. Two exchange missions to Kenya to promote the use of climate data. This mission aimed to facilitate the development of climate insurance in Burkina Faso. It was financed by Japan. This initiative exposed Burkina Faso's partners in the collection, management and practical use of climate data and improved planning of climate change-dependent development activities.

The lessons learned from these exchanges allowed Burkina's partners to guide the formulation of their climate insurance initiative in preparation with UNDP and GEF.

Problem

 The negative impacts of climate change on agricultural yields and the food security situation in Africa are of concern. Projected yield reductions in some countries could reach 50% by 2020, and net crop revenues could fall by 90% by 2100, with small farmers being the most severely affected. Risks related to weather and climate shocks are critical constraints for rural people who are engaged in agricultural activities or whose livelihoods are highly dependent on the agricultural sector.

Recently, indexed risk transfer products such as index insurance have emerged as a potentially effective climate risk transfer mechanism for rural populations.

ACRE-Agriculture and Climate Risk Enterprise Ltd operates as a for-profit enterprise that has evolved from the Kilimo Salama project (established in 2009) funded by the Syngenta Foundation and the Global Index Insurance Facility (GIIF). ACRE Africa is licensed in Kenya, Rwand, and Tanzania as a service provider working with local insurers and other stakeholders in the agricultural insurance value chain.

Solution

UNDP organized from March 30 to April 4, 2015 a study trip to Kenya for the benefit of rural sector structures including agriculture, livestock, environment and the directorate of meteorology. This study trip allowed to exchange with the technical team of Agriculture and Climate Risk Enterprise (ACRE), to exchange with the producers who subscribed to the insurance products, to visit the stations used for the monitoring of the risk and to exchange with the technical services involved in the agricultural risk management process in Kenya. It also allowed to meet and discuss directly with the services involved in the issue of climate insurance, including agriculture and livestock and Weather Kenya.

Through these exchanges, the study trip team was able to:

  • to confront the theoretical vision with the reality of agricultural insurance;
  • to control the mode of operation and operation of a climate insurance for the benefit of the breeders or farmers;
  • acquire the operational process of developing insurance products and monitoring indicators
  • and the main requirements of an agricultural insurance scheme.

Supported by: UNDP

Implementing Agency: Kenya Agriculture and Climate Risk Enterprise (ACRE)

Contact:
Herve Kouraogo,
Economics Specialist,
UNDP Burkina Faso,
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Summary
Sharing with São Tomé and Principe and Togo the Malagasy experience in the field of development aid effectiveness, and specifically on the themes of transparency and tools and mechanisms of coordination.

Challenge
Ensuring the quality of decision making by government organizations - whether deciding where to invest in logistics infrastructure, or where to dig a well - requires the availability of accurate, relevant and accessible information and data. As part of the aid effectiveness agenda, technological solutions and information management tools have been developed to collect and organize key data from different projects to improve the information provided to those responsible for development effectiveness. The Aid Management Platform (AMP) is an information-sharing tool that allows developing country governments to streamline their management of international aid.

With the creation in 2008 of the Permanent Secretariat for Aid Coordination (STPCA), attached to manage a database that is supported to the Prime Minister's Office, and responsible for managing a database on aid (Platform for Help: MPA - Madagascar), Madagascar is able, with the participation of development partners, to collect and share all development cooperation projects. AMP - Madagascar is an open data web application (www.amp-madagascar.gov.mg) that contains more than 1000 projects funded by about 30 multilateral and bilateral collaborations, about 30 decentralized collaborations and about 20 international NGOs.

Solution

The similarities of the management tools and the monitoring mechanism of official development assistance as well as the expertise of Madagascar in this field makes this experience very attractive for other countries:

Togo: Following a support from the Permanent Technical Secretary in charge of Aid Coordination (STP-CA Madagascar) to Togo in 2013, a Togolese delegation visited Madagascar between 21 and 25 July 2014, for Strengthen its capacity in the management of the aid monitoring database thanks to the transmission of know-how of the Malagasy teams in charge of the base (AMP) for the country. The good practices learned are integrated directly into the aid management platform, mainly with regard to the functional aspect.

São Tomé and Príncipe is currently in the consolidation phase of the information system for Aid Management, and in this context, the country maintains contacts with the Permanent Technical Secretariat - Aid Coordination (STP-CA), for gain knowledge of innovation on development effectiveness.

Supported by: UNDP

Implementing Agency: Permanent Aid Coordination Secretariat (STPCA)

Contact:
FALL, El Hadji Ndji Mamadou.,
Senior Economist,
UNDP Madagascar and Comoros,
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Sabina dos Ramos,
Program Analyst / PMSU,
UNDP São Tomé and Príncipe,
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Wednesday, 27 June 2018 09:40

Summary

Regional workshop to strengthen regional collaboration between the Lake Kivu Basin and Ruzizi River Authority (Abakir) and the Lake Tanganyika Authority (ALT) for better water management and preservation in the Lake Kivu Basin and the Ruzizi River

Challenge

The increasing scarcity of water combined with environmental degradation, deteriorated infrastructures and a rapidly growing population has led to a growing potential for violent conflict, or “water wars”, between nations over shared water resources.  The social and public health consequences of insufficient access to water are very significant for local communities.

In order to improve the living conditions of vulnerable populations in the region and to prevent the risk of natural disasters, the three riparian countries face the common challenge of efficient management of water resources. As such, the three countries of this basin have been trying since 2011 to coordinate the management of water resources to ensure the long-term water supply of the dams built in the Ruzizi waterfalls.

Solution

A regional workshop was organized in October 2014.

The workshop made it possible to exchange expert views, define priority activities and reinforce the ownership of North and South Kivu provincial authorities regarding the sustainable management of Lake Kivu and the Ruzizi River. Also the workshop extended and strengthened the cooperation and collaboration framework between ABAKIR and ALT to adopt a coordinated approach towards the fight against water wars as well as appropriate measures and common rules for the regulation of human and endogenous activities in Lake Kivu.

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: The Lake Kivu Basin and Ruzizi River Authority (Abakir) and the Lake Tanganyika Authority (ALT)

Contact person: Ernest  BAMOU, Economic Advisor, UNDP DRC, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Summary

Experience sharing between Senegal and Togo on the use of IT in the justice chains

Challenge

Togo is in the process of reform and modernization of its  Public Administration. Efforts are dedicated to the improvement of the coordination and management capacities, the strengthening of the judicial system and the consolidation of the rule of law as an essential factor to promote investments and economic growth. Under performance and poor capacity of the public institutions undermine sustainable development. In doing so, a well functioning, efficient and solid judicial system is key to successfully promote access to justice for all.

Solution

The solution proposed consisted on sharing the experience of Senegal regarding the computerisation of the judicial system with Togolese experts in Lome during the month of July 2014. The Senegalese experts (from the Ministry of Justice, the University Cheikh Anta Diop and the Bar of Lawyers) met their Togolese counterparts to help the Togolese justice system to begin the process of computerization so as to improve speed and security of court procedures and decisions.

As a result of the exchange, the needs for equipment, network infrastructure, human resources and training for the implementation of the computerization of the judicial chains were assessed in 32 jurisdictions. ICT are gradually being introduced to reduce delays, overhead, bureaucracy and administrative barriers.

As such, Togo’s judicial system’s productivity and efficiency has improved by setting up a computer network that allows for better organization and storage of data.

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: Ministère de la justice et des relations avec les institutions de la République

Contact person: Ginette  MONDOUGOU CAMARA, Economic Advisor, UNDP Togo, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Tuesday, 26 June 2018 12:50

Summary

Between 2005 and 2008, Namibia's Urban Development Support project was based on the expertise of Caixa Econômica Federal (CAIXA), a Brazilian public banking entity with extensive work in the areas of urban development, housing and social program management. Coordinated by the Brazilian Cooperation Agency (ABC), this project aimed to transfer constructive methodologies adapted to the Namibian reality, as well as to support the elaboration of proposals for public policies of popular housing and the formulation of solutions for the treatment of solid waste and basic sanitation.

Challenge

Since its independence (in 1990), Namibia has verified the need for structuring and implementing public policies for urban development. The lack of regulation of land use, the prevalence of self-built substandard housing, and significant deficiencies in terms of urban infrastructure have since continued to mark the country's large cities.

Solution

Namibia's Urban Development Support project encompassed three complementary aspects: (1) support for the formulation of housing policies aimed at the low-income population; (2) the transfer of non-conventional construction methodologies appropriate to the local reality; and (3) the development of a pilot project in the area of solid waste management and basic sanitation. The activities involved the exchange and training of technicians for the shared development of the products, as well as the participation of the local population in the cities of Rehoboth and Okahandja.

(1) In order to support the development of policies for the construction of housing, a survey was carried out on existing legislation in Namibia involving officials from Okahandja and Rehoboth municipalities and the Ministry of Regional and Local Government, Housing and Rural Development, as well as community representatives. After the identification of Brazilian documents that could be adapted to the Namibian reality, the terms of the document regulating the country's housing policy were discussed. Topics discussed included spatial planning, definition of beneficiaries of housing programs, environmental education and public participation. The Brazilian team recommended the adoption of participatory methodology as a new paradigm of public policy in Namibia.

(2) To promote the construction of low-cost housing, a seminar was held on non-conventional construction methodologies (using local materials and labor), presenting examples from the Brazilian experience. Subsequently, training was carried out in the municipality of Okahandja on the cement soil technique, attended by representatives of the Namibian Habitat Research Development Center and UN Habitat. Community members who participated in the training learned how to produce soil-cement blocks, their form of settlement, and other constructive details.

(3) In the area of solid waste management, successful experiences were shared in Brazil and a diagnosis was made of the current situation in Namibia. Consequently, CAIXA carried out training with recyclable waste collectors, who learned how to collect and store it for later sale to recycling companies. With the qualification of their work, these women could envisage an increase in their income, by acting according to technical guidelines and jointly. The cooperation also included a diagnosis of the dump in which the solid waste collected by the municipality of Rehoboth was deposited, since a landfill had not yet been implemented locally; based on this, recommendations were made to improve the management of urban cleaning and to carry out environmental education campaigns. As evolution of the disseminated knowledge, the following developments were highlighted: the daily weighing of garbage (with monthly reports); the enclosure of the dump area; the provision by the municipality of Rehoboth of a shed for the storage of recyclable materials; and the hiring of another outsourced company for garbage collection.

This project was the first South-South cooperation initiative implemented by CAIXA and is a "promising practice" in UN-Habitat's "Best Practices and Local Leadership Program".

Supported by: Brazilian Cooperation Agency (ABC)

Implementation agency:
On the Brazilian side: Caixa Econômica Federal (CAIXA)
On the Namibian side: Ministry of Regional and Local Government, Housing and Rural Development

Contact person:
Leonardo Miguel Farinassi,
National Manager of International Relations Strategy,
Caixa Econômica Federal (CAIXA)
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Tuesday, 26 June 2018 12:42

Summary

Held between 2010 and 2011, the Cape Verde Housing Development Support project was based on the expertise of Caixa Econômica Federal (CAIXA), a Brazilian public banking entity with extensive work in the areas of urban development, housing and social program management. Coordinated by the Brazilian Cooperation Agency (ABC), this project aimed at transferring knowledge from CAIXA and the Brazilian Ministry of Cities related to the "Minha Casa Minha Vida" program, aimed at replicating it in Cape Verde through the "Casa for All "of the ministry in charge of housing.

Challenge

The Cape Verdean government elected 2009 as "Year of Housing" and promoted measures and strategies to promote social housing throughout the country, seeking to create the conditions for the gradual fulfillment of one of the constitutional determinations claimed by the population: the right housing. Thus, the "House for All" program was created in that year, considering that the country then had a quantitative housing deficit of about 40 thousand houses (according to data from the ministry in charge of housing). However, there was still a need to formally structure the program as a public housing policy, in order to make it capable of grouping and institutionalizing the instruments required for the promotion and viability of the construction of new housing (8.5 thousand units) and the rehabilitation of preexisting precarious housing (about 16 thousand units).

Solution

The Cape Verde Housing Development Support project aimed to transfer knowledge to the structuring of the "House for All" program, in terms of the consolidation of instruments and procedures necessary for its implementation. The cooperation involved technical visits to initiatives carried out by the Brazilian housing program, training of a ministry staff in charge of housing, technical advice and the joint preparation of support tools and documents with guidelines related to the production of housing developments for the population of low income.

Thus, the project included the training of Cape Verdean professionals in the analysis of unproven income and the provision of technical assistance to the ministry in charge of housing in several areas, such as:
- consolidation of the methodology for calculating the housing deficit and the inadequacy of housing;
- the preparation of the guide of adhesion of the municipalities to the National System of Housing of Social Interest;
- preparation of the "Casa para Todos" manuals;
- the calculation of the distribution of subsidies under the program and the structuring of the guarantee fund;
- elaboration of the methodology for implementing urban, legal and tax instruments for urban policy;
- the structuring of a national program to support sustainable land regularization; and
- the structuring of territorial registers with multiple purposes.

Among the products prepared jointly by CAIXA and the Cape Verdean ministry in charge of housing are the following documents and instruments necessary for the implementation of the "Casa para Todos" program:
- tenderer's manuals and engineering analysis;
- the social work manual (which included the training of about 100 local staff);
- the operating procedures manual for contracting;
- a technical analysis report on the adequacy of the Cape Verdean single cadastre structure (registration system that allows the identification of the low-income families that will benefit from the program);
- the electronic selection of beneficiaries of social housing through a single cadastre;
- the financial model for sustaining the program;
- the financial calculation worksheet compatible with local reality;
- a manual of technological innovations; and
- a spreadsheet with parameters for the analysis of the tenders for the contracting of builders.

Thanks to the results of this cooperation initiative, the Cape Verdean government was able to carry out international competitions to build, initially, 1,7 thousand new housing units. The Cape Verde Housing Development Support project is part of the "best practices" published in UN-Habitat's "Best Practices and Local Leadership Program".

Supported by: Brazilian Cooperation Agency (ABC) and Caixa Econômica Federal (CAIXA)

Implementation agency:
On the Brazilian side: CAIXA and the Ministry of Cities
On the Cape Verde side: Ministry of Environment, Housing and Spatial Planning, and Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Cooperation and Communities

Contact person:
Leonardo Miguel Farinassi,
National Manager of International Relations Strategy,
Caixa Econômica Federal (CAIXA)
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Tuesday, 26 June 2018 12:34

Summary

Between 2009 and 2013, this South-South cooperation project sought to review the rural vocational training methodology of the National Rural Learning Service (SENAR) of Brazil for technicians of the Institute of Agrarian Development (IDA) of Angola, with the initial objective of to promote the improvement of income and the quality of life of family farmers in the province of Kwanza Sul.

Challenge

The predominant agriculture in Angola is subsistence, with rudimentary agricultural practices and the use of hand tools. As a result, the low productivity of crops limits the income and quality of life of small family farmers. In the coastal province of Kwanza Sul, the inefficient management of plantations has negative consequences for the livelihood of the families of the rural producers, who end up depending on the importation of food. Thus, the lower supply of food typical of the local diet compromises the food and nutritional security of these communities.

The training and professionalisation of technicians related to agriculture and rural producers are therefore a possible instrument to revitalize this productive sector and foster the growth of food production. The main challenge is to adapt more efficient agricultural methods to the characteristics of the Angolan rural environment, as well as to introduce them, through educational actions, in the sociocultural context of traditional communities.

Solução

In this cooperation project, technical training was the main strategy adopted to promote the improvement of the quality of life of rural communities in the province of Kwanza Sul, Angola. The SENAR technicians adapted the methodology of the rural vocational training courses used in Brazil to qualify Angolan farmers and rural workers. After the first diagnosis of local rural working conditions, technicians also included a module on the importance of the correct use of basic personal protective equipment, especially with regard to the safe handling of fertilizers. In particular, the project transferred knowledge through the training of 20 IDA technicians and local agents. Trained as instructors, they can now disseminate SENAR's methodology to a larger number of family farmers.

Thanks to the formations, some basic techniques adapted to the Angolan socio-cultural reality have helped to improve the productivity of the crops in the communities served. For example, family farmers have learned how to construct and manipulate a wooden instrument (called crowbar) that allows demarcating terrain in contours, a simple solution to protect plantations rooted in rough terrain from rainfall, and efficiency. Basic techniques of soil analysis also began to guide farmers on the fertility of the land. SENAR educators also conducted training on the use of ratchets, another very simple and efficient tool for fertilization and planting in small areas.

The exchange of professionals from both countries involved two visits of SENAR technicians to Angola between 2010 and 2012, and a visit of a group of 13 Angolan technicians to Brazil in 2012 to meet rural properties in Paraná. On this occasion, the group also participated in a program focused on management and entrepreneurship, in addition to training on the processing of soybeans for food use.

This cooperation project bore fruit in both countries: on the one hand, it took agricultural training techniques to Angola; on the other hand, laid the foundations for the development by SENAR of its own methodology for adapting programs of technical assistance and vocational training in other developing countries (the entity currently has a specific unit for international cooperation).

Supported by:
On the Brazilian side: Brazilian Cooperation Agency (ABC) and National Rural Apprenticeship Service (SENAR)
For the Angolan side: Institute of Agrarian Development (IDA / Ministry of Agriculture)

Implementing agency: National Rural Apprenticeship Service (SENAR)

Contact person:
Daniel Küppel Carrara,
Director General,
National Rural Apprenticeship Service (SENAR)
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.