Thursday, 28 June 2018 15:22

Summary

Experience learning visit on existing early warning system in Kenya

Challenge

It is expected that as climate change unfolds in Benin, the variability of the frequency and intensity of climate related shocks will increase, thereby necessitating various socio- economic sectors to adapt. Benin’s vulnerability to weather risks was demonstrated in 2010 when Benin suffered more than USD 262m in losses to various socio-economic sectors (e.g., agriculture, commerce, and infrastructure) due to flooding. Similarly, Benin’s coastal region, home to over 3 million inhabitants and one of West and Central Africa’s largest trading markets has been victim to coastal encroachment by as much as 16 meters per year causing major impacts on fishing, port industries and tourism.

In a developing country such as Benin, climate change impacts are exacerbated by limited outreach mechanisms to local levels and a country dependence on subsistence agriculture. For Benin, improving Climate Information (CI) collection and developing an Early Warning System (EWS) is an effective way to build the general population’s weather / climate risk awareness so that communities (particularly rain-fed farmers) can prepare accordingly. However, currently, an early warning system for multi-risk forecasting (e.g. coastal surge and flooding) as well as the capacities to produce and disseminate weather/climate information does not exist in Benin.

Solution

This solution consisted of a study mission to Kenya from 24 to 29 March 2014. The Center for Climate Prediction and Application (ICPAC) of the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (IGAD) based in Kenya has an EWS which covers all East Africa countries. The ICPAC is also in contact with all other national and regional institutions based in Kenya  involved in early warning.

The main objective of the mission was to visit and learn about the functioning and the different components of early warning systems in Kenya. Specifically, the mission involved:

  • Acquiring knowledge about various technical components (equipment, technologies and IT infrastructures) of the EWS (from the data acquisition and transmission phase, to the production-dissemination phase of the alert, via the data processing and forecasting phase);
  • Meeting the main structures involved in the prevention of hydro-climatic risks in order to understand the organizational model and the institutional functioning of EWS in Kenya and in East Africa;
  • Learning about the limits and the level of security offered by the existing devices in the prevention of hydro-climatic risks;
  • Getting to know the administrative, legal and financial aspects of early warning activity on hydro-climatic risks in Kenya and East Africa under the leadership of IGAD; as well as aspects relating to the integration of the private sector.

The experience acquired has made it possible to strengthen the capacities of the national structures involved in the implementation of the Early Warning System (EWS). A transient EWS for flood management was set up in 2014. The national coverage for climate / weather monitoring has improved by 26% from 30% to 56%. The periodicity of collecting and transmitting station data has improved from a previously (challenging) monthly basis to a daily one.

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: Direction Générale de l’Eau, Institut National de l’Eau, Agence Nationale de la Météorologie ou Météo-Bénin, Institut des Recherches Halieutiques et Océanologiques du Bénin (IRHOB)

Centre de prévision climatique et d’applications de l’IGAD, Autorité Intergouvernementale pour le Développement, Bureau sous-régional de l’OMM pour l’Afrique Centrale et Australe, Autorité nationale de gestion de la sécheresse, Centre régional de cartographie des ressources pour le développement, Département de la Météorologie du Kenya et Direction des Ressources en Eau au Ministère de l’Environnement, de l’Eau et des Ressources Naturelles

Contact person: Isidore Agbokou, Team Leader, Unité Développement Durable et Croissance Inclusive, Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement - This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Thursday, 28 June 2018 14:58

Summary

Cameroon’s capacity to develop and implement strategies for the quality of services provided to users was reinforced through exchanges with Moroccan and Rwandan government officials.

Challenge

Cameroon faces governance deficits, which have negative impacts in the form of corruption, poor and inefficient public administration, and an unattractive business environment. Improving the quality of service helps restoring the relationship of trust between administrations and users through transparency and access to accurate information, the quality of reception and the possibility of recourse, with the purpose of reducing corruption and improving the business climate.

Solution

Strengthen the delegation's knowledge in the field of developing and implementing strategies for the quality of services provided to users, through exchanges with Moroccan and Rwandan government officials.This study trip contributed to the development of human capital (targeted training, reform of HRM provisions, etc.), the development of user information systems, the re-reading, and the re-adaptation of the institutional framework (Constitution, laws, etc.). Through these exchanges, Cameroon has been able to develop an ISO homologous Quality of Service Standard, which is the first in Sub-Saharan Africa. The Cameroon Quality Standard of Service NC 1756: 2017 is currently being implemented in some public services.

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: The Ministry of Public Service and Administrative Reform of Cameroon through the Support Program for Quality Improvement of User Services (PAAQSU).

Contact person: Cameroun: Jean Paul NLEND NKOTT ; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Summary

Police forces of Rwanda and Côte d’Ivoire share experiences on how to apply ICT innovations in their Police and GBV projects, by using mobile phone short text messages to address GBV issues

Challenge

The 2015 UN Women Beijing +20 Report points to Africa as having the highest prevalence of physical or sexual intimate partner violence at 45.6% in low- to middle-income countries.

African Security Organs have made firm commitments and considerable progress to support the move to end violence against women and girls. Rwanda`s security Organs in partnership with the One-UN Rwanda launched the campaign in Kigali in October 2010 in high level international conference under the theme: “The Role of African Security Organs in Ending Violence Against Women and Girls”. The conference was concluded with a proclamation and signing of the Kigali International Conference Declaration (KICD).

In addition, since 2000 Rwanda has adopted the concept of human security, which places the individual at the "centre of analysis". Putting the citizen at the centre of security concerns, especially the vulnerable, is likely to strengthen people's confidence in the police. Also, Rwanda has created the Gender Desk for combating gender-based violence and the One Stop Centre, a medical centre for victims of gender-based violence. There is one Gender Desk per police station, 74 of its kind in Rwanda. The One Stop Centre welcomes victims, and besides health services offers them lodging until their reintegration in a safe environment. There are 30 One Stop Centres in Rwanda.

Côte d’Ivoire’ security sector has been severely affected by the decade of socio-political crisis and the violent post-election crisis of 2010. The restoration of security and of state authority has thus been at the forefront of the Ivorian government's priorities in its post-crisis program. Therefore, the Government and its national and international partners have made many efforts to promote reconciliation at all levels and the adoption of a person-centred concept of security.  

Solution

As part of the implementation of South-South cooperation between Côte d'Ivoire and Rwanda, an Ivorian delegation led by the Ministry of State, Ministry of the Interior and Security and composed of representatives of the National Gendarmerie, the National Security Council, the National Assembly, the police services of the United Nations Operation in Côte d'Ivoire carried out a visit of work and exchange in Rwanda in November 2014. The aim of the exchange was to share experiences regarding the implementation of security and social cohesion policies while highlighting best practices and lessons learned in this field.

During this stay in Rwanda, the Ivorian mission met with all the governmental partners (Ministries or institutions in charge of security, justice, solidarity, social cohesion, police, gendarmerie) and national and international non-governmental organizations, as well as United Nations agencies involved in the implementation of security sector policies, programs and projects.

These working sessions made it possible to take stock of the security situation and to learn how to apply ICT innovations in the Police and GBV projects, by using mobile phone short text messages to address GBV issues.

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: Ministère de l’Intérieur de Côte d’Ivoire; Rwanda National Police

Contact person: El Allassane Baguia, Unité Politique et Stratégie, PNUD-Côte d'Ivoire, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Thursday, 28 June 2018 09:56

Summary

Two experts from the Executive Secretariat of the National Council for the Environment and Sustainable Development (CNEDD) visited Senegal to benefit from the country's experience in climate insurance for the development of a similar project in Niger

Challenge

The negative impacts of climate change on agricultural yields and food security situation Africa are worrying. Projected yield reductions in some countries could reach 50% by 2020, and net crop revenues could fall by 90% by 2100, with small farmers being the most severely affected. Risks related to weather and climate shocks are critical constraints for rural people who are engaged in agricultural activities or whose livelihoods are highly dependent on the agricultural sector.

Article 4.8 of the UNFCCC mentions "insurance" as one of the main means of responding to the negative impacts of climate change (as well as financing and technology transfer). Insurance can indeed be an effective tool for climate risk management when combined with other measures such as early warning systems, risk information, disaster risk reduction and adaptation to climate change.

Recently, indexed risk transfer products such as index insurance have emerged as a potentially effective climate risk transfer mechanism for rural populations. Insurance is linked to an index, often meteorological, such as rainfall, temperature, humidity or crop yields, rather than actual loss.

Solution

Two experts from the Executive Secretariat of the National Council for the Environment and Sustainable Development (CNEDD) visited Senegal to benefit from the country's experience on climate insurance for the development of a similar project in Niger.

With this study trip Nigerian managers have better understood the methods used in Senegal by the agricultural index insurance project to identify and select intervention sites and collect basic data. Thanks to lessons learned, Niger has better prepared its pilot climate insurance index against drought, adopting a similar methodology for identifying project implementation sites and better ways of collecting data.

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: Executive Secretariat of the National Council for the Environment and Sustainable Development (CNEDD)

Contact person: Amata  DIABATE, Economic Advisor, UNDP Niger, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Summary

A cooperation agreement between the governments of Burundi and Singapore, with the support of UNDP, has been signed, amounting to almost $ 2.5 million. This South-South cooperation focuses on the realization of an innovative master plan to guide the development of the capital of Burundi and its surroundings by 2045.

Challenge

The city of Bujumbura as the political, social and economic capital of Burundi has a real potential for development. However, its future urban development faces real challenges: today, although only 1 Burundian out of 10 is urban, the city of Bujumbura alone is home to 3/4 of the urban population of the country. In 1962, the capital had about 60,000 inhabitants. In 2014, the estimates are of 800,000 inhabitants. This population is concentrated mainly in peripheral districts where the density sometimes reaches more than 2,000 inhabitants per km². It is projected, according to the African Development Bank (AfDB), that by 2030 the urban population of Burundi will reach 2.63 million people, which would represent 19 percent of the total population.

This rapid and continuous urbanization, especially in the city of Bujumbura, is leading to deterioration in the quality of life of citizens and the environment. Beyond population growth, the development of Bujumbura faces other challenges such as: lack of planning tools and urban management; inadequate legislation; low household incomes in relation to the cost of housing; the lack of electrical energy; the rural exodus of young people.

The current challenge is to be able to manage the development of the capital and guarantee a better living and working environment for its inhabitants.

Solution

Singapore's support combined the provision of a wide range of experience-based technical knowledge at both national and provincial levels. The core of this South-South cooperation mechanism with Singapore was the Singapore Cooperation Enterprise (SCE) technical assistance, consulting services and best practice sharing.

Under the Agreement, SCE shared Singapore’s urban developmental experience and expertise with the capital City of Bujumbura. The project started in July 2014 and spanned over 18 months, which would include 12 months of Master Plan preparation and 6 months of capacity building, where SCE would conduct knowledge transfer of best practices in urban development with the Burundian Government’s urban planning team to successfully implement the Master Plan.

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: Singapore Cooperation Enterprise (SCE)

Contact person: Charles NIZIGIMANA ( in the ministry) - email :This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.; Marie-Ange KIGEME (UNDP) email:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Summary

High level expert mission and experience sharing activities between Mauritius and Côte d’Ivoire to assist the Government of Côte d'Ivoire in developing an operational action-plan to support youth employment creation.

Challenge

The extent of underemployment (20.9% of the labor force in 2014) and youth (9.6%) and women unemployment (10% vs. 4.8% at men's) in Côte d'Ivoire is a key factor that explains persistent poverty. Green job opportunities and job training opportunities for young people are limited due to low economic diversification and insufficient processing of commodities. The same is true of microenterprise development, which suffers from lack of technical and financial support. Youth unemployment, if not sufficiently addressed, could also be an obstacle to the dynamics of social cohesion and peacebuilding.

Solution

An employment senior specialist from Mauritius Ministry of Finance participated in a high-level expert mission in December 2014 to share Mauritius experience with the Government of Côte d’Ivoire and assist in developing an Operational Action-Plan to ensure tangible results and strengthen institutional coherence across government policies and structures.  As a result of the study tour, Côte d’Ivoire developed a policy on youth employment creation that was delivered at the level of the President. 

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: Ministère de la promotion de la jeunesse, de l’emploi des jeunes et du service civique

Contact person: El Allassane Baguia  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Summary

Through a partnership between the National Observatory for Human Development in Morocco and the National Observatory of Sustainable Human Development and the Poverty Alleviation of Mali, a series of exchanges and capacities building activities have taken place between the two institutions.

Challenge

Under the supervision of the Ministry of Social Development, Solidarity and the Elderly (MDSSPA), the main mission of the National Observatory of Sustainable Human Development and the Poverty Alleviation of Mali (ODHD/LCP) is to undertake studies and research in the fields of sustainable human development and the fight against poverty. The solution seeks to address the information system and the capabilities of analysis and evaluation of public policies’ to improve decision-making and ultimately, good governance. Specifically, it aims at consolidating a culture of public policy, performance measurement, as well as transparency and accountability.

Solution

In June 2014, the ODHD/LCP of Mali participated at the International conference on methods for measuring human development and equity-oriented assessment approaches. The Director of the ODHD presented the process of elaboration of the poverty index of the communes of Mali.

A partnership agreement was concluded between observatories in Morocco and Mali.

As part of this South-South partnership, the National Observatory for Human Development of Morocco (ONDH) received a Malian delegation composed of senior officials of the Government of Mali and experts in August 2017. Following several participations of Mali in the forums and seminars organized by the ONDH, the National Observatory of Sustainable Human Development and the Poverty Alleviation of Mali (ODHD/LCP) requested the support of the ONDH to strengthen its capacities in two areas: Information System and Human Development Expertise.

Supported by: UNDP, UNICEF, UNFPA, UNWOMEN

Implemented by: Mali: Observatoire du Développement Humain Durable et de la Lutte Contre la Pauvreté (ODHD/LCP); Maroc: Observatoire National du Développement Humain (ONDH)

Contact person: Bécaye Diarra, Economics Advisor & Head of Strategic and Policy Unit, United Nations Development Programme, Office in Mali, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Summary

The formerly well developed Oti-Kéran National (OKM) Park in Northern Togo has experienced significant infrastructure decline and lost most of its wildlife and fauna. The project aims at strengthening the management of the system of protected areas in Togo, through improving the contribution to the conservation of biodiversity through effective approaches to rehabilitation and management of protected areas. In view of the transboundary nature of the parc, the initiative helps Togo to develop prerequisites to be able to re-join in the coming years the initiative for the conservation of biodiversity  (W-Arly-Pendjari complex which used to be well connected to Togo's OKM complex) led by Burkina Faso, Benin and Niger.

Challenge

Togo's system of protected areas is experiencing severe challenges of declining infrastructure, poor management, gaps in staffing as well as inadequate legal and policy frameworks. Especially in the Oti-Kéran-Mandouri Complex, situated in the north of the country and adjacent to Burkina Faso and Bénin, wildlife and fauna has largely disappeared and threatens biodiversity on a regional scale.

This decline reflects an overall decline in the countries socio-political situation since the 1990s. In spite of its good location next to a transboundary Elephant and mammal migration corridor, this situation has also caused a complete standstill of the ecotourism sector and forced local communities to exploit the Protected Area for their livelihood.

Solution

Launched in 2012, the project aims at strengthening the management of the system of protected areas in Togo,

improving the contribution to the conservation of biodiversity through effective approaches to rehabilitation and management of protected areas. In view of the trans boundary nature of the park, the initiative helps Togo to develop prerequisites to be able to join in the coming years the initiative for the conservation of biodiversity led by Burkina Faso, Benin and Niger in partnership with EU, WAEMU and UNDP.

Supported By: UNDP, WAEMU , Global Environment Facility

Implemented By: UNDP

Contact person: Ginette  MONDOUGOU CAMARA, Economic Advisor, UNDP Togo, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

Wednesday, 27 June 2018 09:40

Summary

Regional workshop to strengthen regional collaboration between the Lake Kivu Basin and Ruzizi River Authority (Abakir) and the Lake Tanganyika Authority (ALT) for better water management and preservation in the Lake Kivu Basin and the Ruzizi River

Challenge

The increasing scarcity of water combined with environmental degradation, deteriorated infrastructures and a rapidly growing population has led to a growing potential for violent conflict, or “water wars”, between nations over shared water resources.  The social and public health consequences of insufficient access to water are very significant for local communities.

In order to improve the living conditions of vulnerable populations in the region and to prevent the risk of natural disasters, the three riparian countries face the common challenge of efficient management of water resources. As such, the three countries of this basin have been trying since 2011 to coordinate the management of water resources to ensure the long-term water supply of the dams built in the Ruzizi waterfalls.

Solution

A regional workshop was organized in October 2014.

The workshop made it possible to exchange expert views, define priority activities and reinforce the ownership of North and South Kivu provincial authorities regarding the sustainable management of Lake Kivu and the Ruzizi River. Also the workshop extended and strengthened the cooperation and collaboration framework between ABAKIR and ALT to adopt a coordinated approach towards the fight against water wars as well as appropriate measures and common rules for the regulation of human and endogenous activities in Lake Kivu.

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: The Lake Kivu Basin and Ruzizi River Authority (Abakir) and the Lake Tanganyika Authority (ALT)

Contact person: Ernest  BAMOU, Economic Advisor, UNDP DRC, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Wednesday, 27 June 2018 09:20

Summary

Experience sharing between Senegal and Togo on the use of IT in the justice chains

Challenge

Togo is in the process of reform and modernization of its  Public Administration. Efforts are dedicated to the improvement of the coordination and management capacities, the strengthening of the judicial system and the consolidation of the rule of law as an essential factor to promote investments and economic growth. Under performance and poor capacity of the public institutions undermine sustainable development. In doing so, a well functioning, efficient and solid judicial system is key to successfully promote access to justice for all.

Solution

The solution proposed consisted on sharing the experience of Senegal regarding the computerisation of the judicial system with Togolese experts in Lome during the month of July 2014. The Senegalese experts (from the Ministry of Justice, the University Cheikh Anta Diop and the Bar of Lawyers) met their Togolese counterparts to help the Togolese justice system to begin the process of computerization so as to improve speed and security of court procedures and decisions.

As a result of the exchange, the needs for equipment, network infrastructure, human resources and training for the implementation of the computerization of the judicial chains were assessed in 32 jurisdictions. ICT are gradually being introduced to reduce delays, overhead, bureaucracy and administrative barriers.

As such, Togo’s judicial system’s productivity and efficiency has improved by setting up a computer network that allows for better organization and storage of data.

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: Ministère de la justice et des relations avec les institutions de la République

Contact person: Ginette  MONDOUGOU CAMARA, Economic Advisor, UNDP Togo, This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Wednesday, 20 June 2018 15:28

Summary

While Sierra Leone has made considerable progress in the consolidation of peace, democracy and its socio-economic development, the country's media sector remains confronted to low levels of professionalism and challenges to provide independent content. To scale up its ongoing media reform, Sierra Leone's most important media actors have established cooperation with Ghana as a pioneer on media freedom on the African continent. Collaboration has allowed to develop a national curriculum for media and journalism studies at Sierra Leone's main university and to set up a network of ECOWAS reporters.

Challenge

Sierra Leone has made considerable progress since the end of the civil war in 2002, consolidating peace, democracy and improving development indicators amid rising rates of economic growth. Its media sector consists of a wide range of public and private entities and is considered as relatively independent. Nevertheless, ranked on place 85 (out of 180) in the World Press Freedom Index 2017, journalists face significant challenges because of a highly competitive market, where financing depends on the allegiance to political and economic interests. Many journalists have only limited training and cannot ensure an adequate level of ethics and professionalism. Especially during the recent Ebola crisis journalists were increasingly confronted to defamation charges.

Solution

Sierra Leone's Media Reform Coordinating group (MCRG), which brings together senior representatives from the country's most important media actors, was established in 2014 and is in charge of facilitating the reform of the media landscape to ensure increased independence, higher ethics and professionalism based on the right of freedom of speech. Supported by UNDP and UNESCO, MCRG overviews and implements an ambitious programme to strengthen responsible journalism. Amongst many objectives, this includes the passing of a media bill and the enhanced recognition of freedom of the press in the National Constitution. It also implements a National Media Development Strategy, provides trainings to journalists, enhances alternative media systems, such as community radio networks, and is working on the establishment of a Centre of Excellence within the Mass Communication Department of Sierra Leone's main

university ("Fourah Bay College"). This is in line with the country's Media Development Strategy which was developed and launched on (World Press Freedom Day) 3rd May 2014. To scale up this reform, representatives have established cooperation with Ghana which is ranked No.26 in the World Press Freedom Index 2017 (before countries such as France and the USA). Ghana has a stable legal framework to ensure independent and free exercise of journalism. Its journalism is characterized by a high degree of professionalism and operates without significant restrictions. The development in the media landscape has been a result of the widening of Ghana’s democratic landscape since 1993. The media has benefitted from strong civil society movements and organizations that have taken advantage of the democratic space to champion the call for the liberalization of the airwaves which has led to media pluralism. Again, the media has collaborated effectively with state and non-state actors to discharge its role as the fourth estate of the realm. For instance, in the 2016 General Election, the National Media Commission the regulatory agency for the media in Ghana partnered with the National Peace Council to sensitize the public on the need for peaceful elections. Similarly, some media houses are working with anti-corruption agencies to tackle the menace of corruption as well as the illegal small-scale mining known in Ghana as ‘Galamsey’. In May 2014 a media delegation from Sierra Leone visited Ghana and interacted with main media agencies such as Ghana Broadcasting Corporation, Ghana Institute of Journalism, African College of Communication, UNESCO, Ghana Network of Community Radio Network and West Africa Media. Exchanges touched upon Ghana's experience to establish a free and high-quality media sector and how the sector contributes to democratic dialogue, accountability, peace and development through its high standards of professional ethics. Delegates agreed to establish joint activities/projects and to enhance the collaboration between the Mass Communication Department of Fourah Bay College and the University of Ghana, especially to ensure the upgrade into a full-fledged Centre of Excellence. Therefore, the Mass communication curriculum at Fourah Bay College was reviewed and the development of over 100 undergraduate media/journalism courses, three track Masters degree

programmes, and a doctoral programme in Mass Communication (under the leadership of a resident professor) was launched. PhD research projects are pursued in the areas of Strategic Media Management, Media and Gender, Media and Democratic Governance, Social Media, African Communication Systems. Furthermore, an association of Communication, Journalism and Media Educator (ACJEM SL) has been established to support to roll out the reviewed curriculum as a national curriculum for media and journalism studies in Sierra Leone. The exchange also led to the signature of a memorandum of understanding (MoU) between the Sierra Leone Media Reform Coordination Group and the Media Foundation for West Africa (MFWA), based in Accra, Ghana. In the meantime, the two partners have conducted a survey on media coverage and reporting on ECOWAS in Sierra Leone. Following the training of a cross section of journalists in Sierra Leone the ECOWAS Reporters Network in Sierra Leone was established.

Supported by: UNDP

Implemented by: Media Reform Coordinating group (MRCG

 

Wednesday, 20 June 2018 15:20

Summary

Ethiopia's economy is undergoing significant tranformation with positive overal growth rates over the past decade ( between 8% - 13%), but faces challenges to scale up productivity and industrialization. The Government puts a major emphasis on export-oriented industries and the industrial sector to allow for a broad based growth that attracts foreign direct investments and addresses the countries's massive unemployment problem. To bring national capacities for enterprise development in the industrial sector to scale, improve industrial planning and ensure the development of policy frameworks that incentivize export, expertise from the rapidly growing Industrial Sector of Asian countries is of major importance.

Challenge

Ethiopia's economy is undergoing significant tranformation with positive overall growth rates over the past decade ( between 8% - 13%). The country places a particular emphasis on promoting its agricultural and export led industrialization. which is targeted to account for 18% of GDP by 2025. As envisaged by the Growth and Transformation Plan II, the development of the industrial sector should allow for a broad based growth that attracts foreign direct investments and become a lever for poverty eradication by adressing the countries's massive unemployment problem, generating income and adequate savings. The potential to unleash export-led industrialisation of the already widely

existing textile and leather manufacturing, is promising, but requires a strategic transformation and systematization of incentives. Currently, Ethiopia's exports are widely dominated by primary commodities (Approximately 90% of all merchandise exports; UNCTAD LDC 2016). The share of the industrial sector in GDP oscillated around 12% between 2006 - 2016 and will need to be scaled up massively if the targed is to be reached. Currently, the sector is characterized by low levels of technical and technological capabilities and lacks competititiveness in the quality and standards of it s products. Institutional support will be critical to develop research and product development as well as productivity and management skills in the sector.

Solution

To strengthen national capacities for enterprise development in the industrial sector in line with the countries' Growth and Transformation Plan, the Ministry of Industry, supported by UNDP, has set up a multiyear capacity building programme that focuses on i) the review of policies and regulatory capacities in industrial development, ii) improving the competitiveness of Ethiopian manufacturing and service industries through enhanced productivity, value chain analyisis and cluster development, and iii) enhancing the skills, knowledge and technical capacity of private sector support giving institutions and Small-/Medium enterprises. The ministries' policy review draws inspiration from successfull examples of other regions. As such, a study on manufacturing export perfomance in 2015 provides a synopsis review of existing export incentives with a particular focus on policy settings of industrial oriented countries in Asia and specific lessons learned shared by the Government of India. It exposes export promotion programmes and lessons learned with regards to interventions that can stimulate the exports of foreign and domestic investors. Based on this review, Ethiopia was able to develop an easily accessible and implementable standard input-output coefficient (SIOC) system on standard input-output coefficient of Ethiopian export products for the beneficiaries of the export promotion schemes and implementing organizations, instead of the existing self-declared input-output coefficient which is cumbersome and time consuming. The system has enabled the exporter to get the raw material/inputs or components required in producing exportable products at the international price and exempts the capital goods needed for the investment from duties and taxes. The development of the system has removed the previous self declared information submitted by the exporter which was exposed to misuse of materials and causes loss of revenue for the government and unfair competition between citizens. The system is developed for six export product categories: leather and leather products, textile and garments, horticulture, agro-processing and food, chemical pharmaceuticals and plastics and metal & engineering products. The aquired knowledge was applied to pre-launch a trial phase of Ethiopia's information system in the leather and textile sector.

Supported by: UNDP, Indian government representation in Ethiopia (Indian Embassy

Implemented by: Ministry of Industry

Contact detail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

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